Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 8th International Conference and Exhibition on Materials Science and Engineering Osaka, Japan.

Day 2 :

  • Materials Science & Engineering
Speaker
Biography:

Professor Chong is an Associate Professor at Monash University Malaysia. He is also holding several adjunct positions and a prestigious fellowship, including a Visiting Professor at the University of Ulsan, Republic of Korea; a Senior Research Fellow at the University of South Australia; a Visiting Scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Germany; and being awarded the prestigious Royal Society Newton Advanced Fellowship (UK) in collaboration with University College London. To date, he has published close to 130 publications in journals, conference proceedings, book and book chapters, and technical reports. 

Abstract:

Solar energy being the largest renewable energy source on earth is an attractive energy source option that could be harnessed to electrify the cities of future. Among the various available solar-based technologies, the conversion of solar into storable form of hydrogen (H2) energy via the photoelectrochemical (PEC) technology is a promising way to harness the great benefits from the Sun. This is achieved through the application of nanostructured semiconductor photoelectrodes in an electrochemical cell, whereby water molecules are dissociated into H2 and oxygen through the sequential PEC reactions occurring on the semiconductor surfaces. To date, however, almost all the singular semiconductor photoelectrodes used exhibited poor performance and low efficiency during the solar H2 fuel conversion. The effective separation of photogenerated charge carriers in photoelectrodes is a key to alleviate this technical issue. This presentation outlines the photogenerated charge transfer properties and PEC water splitting ability in various nanostructured semiconductor thin films and composites. Specifically, singular and composite semiconductor materials of α-Fe2O3, BiVO4, and MoO3 synthesized on fluorine-doped tin oxide as active photoelectrodes used for solar energy conversion and storage are discussed. Additionally, the role and mechanism of metal and non-metal dopants on the photogenerated charge transfer properties of semiconductor thin films and composites are elucidated. These are further interpreted using the outcomes from an advanced suite of characterisation methods, including FE-SEM, EDX, XPS, XRD and FTIR, and EIS. It is believed that the fundamental understanding gained through our studies is essential and helpful to design high-performance photoelectrodes for the application in PEC water splitting. 

Speaker
Biography:

Montadhar Almoussawi is a PhD student working on a project about friction stir welding of steel alloys, he is doing modelling and simulation for the process, tool optimisation and many experimental including SEM_EDS, XRD residual stress analysis and heat treatments. The project aim is to control the welding parameters in order to produce sound welds.

Abstract:

The recants findings in unpublished work on friction stir welding of DH36 steel carried out at TWI company shows elements segregation of Mn, Si, O, Al when the welding speeds exceeds 500RPM-400 mm/min. The mechanism of this segregation is not fully understood and the presence of Oxygen within this segregated elements is also needs investigation. This work investigate for the first time the elements segregation of DH36 steel by carrying out many heat treatments in within ranges of temperatures 1200-1500 and different cooling rates. Two welding speeds were also used during the welding process, low welding speeds (100mm/min, 200RPM) and high welding speeds (400mm/min, 550RPM).  The results showed that segregation is only starting when the temperature exceeds 1400 and the complete segregation of Mn, Si, O, Al is occur at 1450C and also is associated with acicular ferrite formation. It is found also high rotational speeds exceeds 500RPM are causing a local melting at advancing-trailing side. The study is aim to estimate peaks temperatures limits that is not causing segregation by choosing the suitable tool rotational and traverse speeds.

Speaker
Biography:

June Park earned his Ph. D in Physics at Chung-Ang University, South Korea, in Feb. 2011. He had studied optical properties of nanomaterials including carbon nanotubes, graphene and carbon related materials in his thesis. He worked as a PostDoc. with experience in synthesizing 2 dimensional materials for use in sensor, optical fiber laser and electronic devices using CVD mainly. Now, he is working for optical lens system at Korea Photonics Technology Institute. 

Abstract:

Chalcogenide glasses including chalcogen elements sulfur, selenium and tellurium, have been studied in optics system for their unique properties including high refractive index and non-linearlity [1]. Among various chalcogenide glasses, Ge-Sb-Se glasses show a good transmittance in the NIR and midIR spectrum from 2 µm ~ 16 µm and have excellent moldability for making molded lens. In order to find optimal lens molding conditions, we investigated thermal properties of Ge-Sb-Se glasses by varying different composition ratio. All of glass samples were synthesized by using melt-quenching method in rocking furnace. The samples are categorized with two kind of chemical formula; Ge(30-x)Sb(10+x)Se60 and Ge(32.5-x)Sb10Se(57.5+x). To confirm amorphous phase of samples, X-ray diffraction measurement was performed. The thermal and thermomechanical properties of Ge-Sb-Se glass sample were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermo mechanical analyzer (TMA), respectively. According to increase of Ge element, mean coordination number (MCN) is increased as shown in Fig. 1. And, we found that the glass transition temperature (Tg) of Ge(30-x)Sb(10+x)Se60 decreased as the increase of MCN of Ge(30-x)Sb(10+x)Se60. It is concluded that the thermal behavior of Ge-Sb-Se glass system is related to the mean bond energies of the elements. Finally, we optimized molding condition of chalcogenide glass system with their thermal properties.

Speaker
Biography:

Dusadee Khamboonrueang is a PhD student in Physics, Department of Physics. Faculty of Science Kasetsart University, Bankok  and a lecturer in major Physics, Department of Science, Faculty of Science and Technology Nakhon Sawan Rajabhat University, Nakhon Sawan, Thailand. Her research interest is the research on how to synthesize the composite of titanium dioxide – grapheme, the properties of composite and it’s applications. She has expertise in materials science and renewable energy.

Abstract:

Titanium dioxide – reduce graphene oxide (TiO2-RGO) composite having difference weight ratio up to 20 wt% were synthesis by hydrothermal method. The hydrothermal method were easier way to prepare TiO2-RGO composites and can also change graphene oxide to reduced graphene oxide along with the particles of titanium dioxide loaded on the surface of the reduce graphene oxide sheet. The image of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the image of titanium dioxide particle dispersed on the surface area of reduce graphene oxide sheet. The peak from Fourier-transform infrared spectra analyzer (FT-IR) showed the peak of functional group of Ti-C-O at 1200 cm-1and1070 cm-1. XRD spectra show titanium dioxide anatase phase peak and The Magnetic properties of the TiO2-RGO were present in weight ratio 5 to 20 wt% as measured by SQUID magnetometer increased 25.14x10-4 emu/g.

Uwe Erb

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Canada

Title: Crystallography of the Corneal Nanonipple Structure on Butterfly Eyes
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Erb received his Ph.D. (1980) in Materials Science from the University of the Saarland (Germany). He currently is a Professor in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Toronto. He is named as inventor on 18 patents related to the synthesis of nanostructured materials by electrochemical methods, and has authored about 250 scientific publications in the field of nanomaterials. Professor Erb and his research team were the first to synthesize fully dense nanostructured materials in 1985, and developed numerous industrial applications for these materials with various companies. More recently, Professor Erb’s research has been broadened to include bio-inspired nanostructures. 

Abstract:

One specific type of corneal nano-nipple arrays found on many insect compound eyes are hexagonally arranged protrusions in the shape of inverted paraboloids. Prior studies have focused on the anti-reflection properties of the eyes due to the nano-nipple structure [e.g. 1], which depends mainly on the shape of individual nipples. However, in the past little attention was given to the details of the arrangement of nano-nipples, which was qualitatively described as consisting of multiple domains. In the current study, remarkable defect structures were found through structural analysis using crystallographic principles.

The investigated species is the Mourning Cloak butterfly (Nymphalis antiopa), which is common in North America as well as Europe and Asia. On its corneas, nano-nipples are predominantly in 2-D hexagonal arrangement with an average diameter of 170 nm and an average lattice parameter of 205 nm [2]. An eye with 2 mm in diameter has approximately 10,000 ommatidia and 140 million nipples. However, within the hexagonal structure, there are nipples that deviate from the regular arrangement by having different numbers of nearest neighbours (NN); instead of 6 NN required by hexagonal symmetry, about 10% of nano-nipples have 5 or 7 NN and are described as 5- and 7-fold coordination defects (disclinations), respectively. Since the 5- and 7-fold disclinations usually occur adjacent to each other, they are collectively referred to as 5-7 defects.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sirikanjana Thongmee now is an Assistant professor of Physics, She was in Physics Department Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University. She got her B.Sc in Physics at Prince of Songkla University, M. Sc. in Chemical Physics at Mahidol University and Ph.D. (Materials Science) at National University of Singapore. Dr. Sirikanjana Thongmee got the Thesis Presentation Award, Mahidol University, Thailand, 1999 and Outstanding Research of the Year 2nd Class Award, Office of the National Research Council of Thailand, Thailand, 2003. Currently Dr. Sirikanjana Thongmee’s researches focus on the metal doped ZnO for spintronics and gas sensors applications, magnetic nanomaterials, graphene oxide for different applications and activated carbon from agricultural waste

Abstract:

The effects of substituting Ag3+ into Ag-doped ZnO NR’s, Zn1-xAgxO (x =0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5) are investigated. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns do not indicate that the Ag ions are systematically replacing the Zn ions but instead are forming into nano Ag particles. Since the radius of the Ag3+ ions (0.126 nm) is much greater than that of Zn2+ (0.072 nm), there would be a tremendous amount of lattice distortion if at the higher level of Ag doping if the Ag ions replaced the Zn ions at the lattice sites.  In the XRD patterns for the pure and x = 0.1 NR’s, we did not observe any peaks of the fcc crystal structure of Ag. When Ag was increased to x  ³ 0.3, we see the reflection from the Ag (1 1 1) and Ag (2 0 0) planes. SEM shows the morphologies of NR’s are changing along with the shape of the rods as the level of Ag substitute increase. For pure ZnO, the rods are orientated perpendicular to the plane appear to be hexagonal. The SEM images of the 1% Ag doped ZnO NR’s still show the presence of rod shaped particles. The morphologies of the 2% Ag doped ZnO NR’s are quite different. Some of them appear to star shape with a few arms emanating from a central point.  SEM image of 5% Ag doped NR’s showed ZnO NR’s appear to be “broccoli” shaped. 

The results from PL spectrum revealed that the visible light emission of the undoped ZnO NR’s are somewhat suppressed but becomes strongly enhanced (in the region between 450 – 600 nm) as the level of Ag doping is increased to 1%, then to 2%.  This could be taken as evidence that more defects were being created as the Ag ions were replacing the Zn in their sites in the wurtzite structure.