Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference and Exhibition on Materials Science and Engineering Atlanta, Georgia, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Carlo Montemagno

University of Alberta, Canada

Keynote: Small things offer big promise

Time : 09:30-09:55

OMICS International Materials Science 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Carlo Montemagno photo
Biography:

Carlo Montemagno, PhD, is the former and founding Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Cincinnati. Immediately prior, he was the Chair of the Department of Bioengineering and Associate Director of the California NanoSystems Institute as well as the Roy & Carol Doumani Professor of Biomedical Engineering at UCLA. Previous to Montemagno’s tenure with UCLA, he served as Associate Professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University.

Montemagno earned his B.S. in Agricultural and Biological Engineering from Cornell (1980) and M.S. in Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering from Penn State University (1990). After completing his undergraduate studies in 1980, he joined the United States Navy and served for ten years in several senior management positions as a Civil Engineering Corps Officer. He then joined Argonne National Laboratory where he led laboratory and field investigations developing bioremediation technology for the treatment of hazardous waste. In 1995 Montemagno earned his PhD in Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences from Notre Dame University. Upon obtaining his PhD in Civil Engineering, he began his academic career as an Assistant Professor at Cornell University in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering where he was one of the pioneers in the field of Nanobiotechnology.

Montemagno has amassed a distinguished scholarly record resulting in a number of patents as well as appointments to numerous editorial boards and governmental committees. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nanomedicine, a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and a Fellow of the NASA Institute of Advance Concepts. He is a recipient of the Feynman Prize for Experimental Work in Nanotechnology.

Montemagno’s current research and near term investigations focus on the development of experimental techniques to integrate metabolic functionality into materials through the engineering of biomolecular systems. Recent efforts addressed the creation of advanced systems for water purification and treatment, and the development of materials for the synthesis of high-value chemicals through the harvesting of solar energy.

Abstract:

The ability to use machines to manipulate matter a single molecule at a time renders many things possible that were impossible before. Living systems do this on a regular basis. The core challenge to accessing life function is transforming the labile molecules that exist in a fragile living organism into a stable engineered system that is economically scalable. The most significant difficulties revolve around environmental stability and the inherent structural limitations of these molecules. The solution to these difficulties is at hand.

Presented is the generic solution methodology used to solve these limiting challenges to produce a new class of materials and devices. By introducing “metabolism” into engineered devices and materials, solutions to grand societal challenges in Medicine, Environment, and Agriculture now appear to be attainable. Furthermore this new technology does not rely on $100’s of millions of infrastructure making it globally assessable to developing nations. It offers a global promise of economic opportunity and prosperity.

Exemplars of the application of this new technology will be shown. We will elucidate the design, engineering and assembly of a complex closed system that uses a highly modified photosynthetic process to transform carbon waste into valuable drop-in specialty chemicals. Enabled by the synthesis of a new class of printable “inks” that have stabilized active biological molecules as integrated elements of synthesized polymer constructs, we will present a technology that transitions additive manufacturing from 3D space to a four-dimensional, functional space creating a whole new class of materials and devices. The application of this technology to medicine, in particular the treatment of type 1 diabetes, glaucoma and other medical conditions will also be illustrated.

OMICS International Materials Science 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Rajendra Singh photo
Biography:

Rajendra Singh is D. Houser Banks professor in the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of Center for Nanoelectronics at Clemson University. During Oil embargo of 1973, he decided to do his PhD dissertation in the area of Silicon solar Cells. With proven success in operations, project/program leadership, R&D, product/process commercialization, and start-ups, Dr. Singh is a leading semiconductor and photovoltaics (PV) expert with over 37 years of industrial and academic experience. From solar cells to low power electronics, he has led the work on semiconductor and photovoltaic device materials and processing by manufacturable innovation and defining critical path. His current research interest is to provide global leadership in phasing out alternating current based grid by PV generated local direct current based power networks. He is fellow of IEEE, SPIE, ASM and AAAS. Dr. Singh has received a number of international awards. Photovoltaics World (October 2010) selected him as one of the 10 Global “Champions of Photovoltaic Technology”. Dr. Singh is 2014 recipient of the SPIE Technology Achievement Award On April 17, 2014 he was honored by US President Barack Obama as a White House “Champion of Change for Solar Deployment” for his leadership in advancing solar energy with PV technology. Rajendra Singh is D. Houser Banks professor in the Holcombe Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of Center for Nanoelectronics at Clemson University. During Oil embargo of 1973, he decided to do his PhD dissertation in the area of Silicon solar Cells. With proven success in operations, project/program leadership, R&D, product/process commercialization, and start-ups, Dr. Singh is a leading semiconductor and photovoltaics (PV) expert with over 37 years of industrial and academic experience. From solar cells to low power electronics, he has led the work on semiconductor and photovoltaic device materials and processing by manufacturable innovation and defining critical path. His current research interest is to provide global leadership in phasing out alternating current based grid by PV generated local direct current based power networks. He is fellow of IEEE, SPIE, ASM and AAAS. Dr. Singh has received a number of international awards. Photovoltaics World (October 2010) selected him as one of the 10 Global “Champions of Photovoltaic Technology”. Dr. Singh is 2014 recipient of the SPIE Technology Achievement Award On April 17, 2014 he was honored by US President Barack Obama as a White House “Champion of Change for Solar Deployment” for his leadership in advancing solar energy with PV technology.

Abstract:

Free fuel based conversion of solar energy and wind energy into electrical power is the only long term solution for providing sustainable global economic growth .There is no direct competition between solar energy (available during day time) and wind energy (mostly available during night times) , however direct solid state conversion of solar energy by photovoltaics (no moving parts) has distinct advantages over electrical power generated by wind turbines With the advent of low-cost solar panels, and our ability to generate, store and use electrical energy locally without the need for long-range transmission, the world is about to witness transformational changes in electricity infrastructure. Semiconductor manufacturing has played a vital role in enabling the communication revolution that started in the last half of the 20th century and is continuing to shape the world of tomorrow. Since the energy crisis of 1973, the cost of photovoltaics (PV) modules has decreased approximately exponentially and the global photovoltaic installations have increased approximately exponentially (cumulative global PV installation of 230 GW by the end of year 2015). In addition to the advancements in the technology of PV module manufacturing, volume manufacturing has played a vital role in the cost reduction. Doubling the cumulative manufacturing size, reduces the cost of PV modules by about 24 %. Unlike integrated circuits and solar cells, batteries are not semiconductor products. However, due to supply chain related issues, connecting various cells to form batteries (similar to ICs and PV modules where number of devices are integrated to form a product), important role of surfaces and interfaces in controlling deice performance, reliability and yield, use of thermal processing steps similar to semiconductor manufacturing and PV manufacturing, the battery manufacturing is following the cost reduction path of semiconductor related products. More than 90 % of the PV market is based on bulk silicon solar cells. The highest efficiency of silicon module modules is about 21.5% efficiency, which is not too far than about 30 % energy conversion efficiency of centralized electrical power generation by nuclear, coal and natural gas. The key objective of this paper is to demonstrate the opportunities and challenges for materials and processing researchers in the area of solar cells and batteries manufacturing. The contributions of materials researchers can lead to technological advancements that will accelerate the pathways for sustained global economic growth for underdeveloped, emerging and developed economies. In addition, the continuous decrease in the cost of photovoltaics (PV) generated and stored local electricity is now making it possible to provide electrical energy to over 3.5 billion people globally who previously had little or no access to electricity.

Keynote Forum

Zofia Niemczura

Arcelormittal Global R&D, USA

Keynote: Heat resistant engineering materials for industrial application

Time : 10:20-10:45

OMICS International Materials Science 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Zofia Niemczura photo
Biography:

Zofia Niemczura is the Metallurgical Engineer granted with PhD and DSc degrees in Physical Metallurgy from Technical University, Poznan, PL, and from Academy of Mining and Metallurgy (AGH), Krakow, Pl. As the professor at TU Poznan she was focused on microstructure-property relationship, phase transformation in steels, heat resistant alloys, and failure analysis, which resulted in 36 publications, and 2 books. She worked later as the researcher and visiting professor in University of IL. at Chicago and ultimately accepted a researcher position in Arcelor Mittal LLC Global R&D, East Chicago, USA. Her main technical focus in recent years was: heat resistant alloys deterioration mechanism and prevention, tool steel, alloy selection and evaluation, failure analysis of manufacturing equipment, and defects in steel sheets. She has been granted of two USA patents, she published student textbook on Mechanical Metallurgy for UIC students plus several additional papers in the journals and conference proceedings. She is also recipient of various recognitions during her carrier in Poland and in USA.

Abstract:

A number of new generation materials such as nonferrous and ferrous-alloys, superalloys, steels, ceramics, polymers, composites, etc., designated for service in the extreme environments have been developed. Some of this materials provide the protection/insulation from heat (e.g. ceramics, polymers) and some offer an outstanding high temperature mechanical properties for the demanding aerospace, energy, and manufacturing industries where the service condition often includes mechanical load, thermal shock, vibrations, and oxidation/corrosion in temperature much above 1000℃. Most industries still rely on ferrous and nonferrous alloys as the main engineering materials for a high temperature application because of its unique combination of strength, creep resistance, resistance to oxidation/chemical attack, and a good thermal conductivity during service. Moreover, the availability and price of most heat resistant steels and alloys make them a preferred industrial material for a high temperature application.

rnA metallurgical study of a wide variety of manufacturing components made of a Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base heat resistant alloys has been performed in the past years. The structural changes due to a long exposure to service temperature >1000℃, heavy load, vibration, and thermal stress have been carefully analyzed. In general, most of heat resistant steels and alloys deteriorate (and eventually fail) during service due to unfavorable microstructure changes such as: decomposition of carbides or other “reinforcing” phases, precipitation of the detrimental phases, phases coalescence and growth, dendrites recrystallization, oxidation and chemical attack on grain boundaries and the alloy depletion in Cr. It was also found that the microstructural changes are associated with not fully recognized changes of a certain physical properties, mainly magnetic, of the alloy. Since the microstructural and magnetic changes are proportional, using the magnetizm to evaluate the current metallurgical condition of the heat resistant equipment parts is very promising.

Break: Group Photo @ Chattahooche-A
Networking & Refreshments Break: 10:45-11:00 @ Foyer
OMICS International Materials Science 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Masaru Matsuo photo
Biography:

Masaru Matsuo has completed his PhD at Kyoto University in Japan and he was a professor of Nara Women’s University. After his retirement, he became a full time professor of Dalian University of Technology in China. Since September 1st 2014, he is a visiting professor of Dalian University of Technology. He has published more than 200 papers in refereed journal articles. He is IUPAC fellow and he received Paul Flory Polymer Research Prize on April 2010.

Abstract:

Implant longevity of hip prosthesis in orthopedics is one of the current topics to support the activities of the elderly. The present work is focused on the drastic improvement for the wear resistance and reduction of the surface friction of the acetabular cup as a bearing material in femoral head. In actual orthopedics, cross-linked polyethylene (PE) has been used in orthopedics as a bearing material in artificial joints. However, wear damages of PE have been one of the factors limiting implant longevity. That is, the resultant wear of polyethylene bearing purportedly produces billions of wear particles with submicron-size that cause adverse pathological reaction in the surrounding tissues leading to osteolysis and joint loosening. To avoid the serous problem, ultra-high molecular weight PE (UHMWPE)/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite was prepared as a substrate layer by the solution-gel method. As for the second layer, porous UHMWPE/HA composite was prepared by using NaCl as the porogen and then poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) was filled into the pores of UHMWPE/HA composite. The porosity of the UHMWPE/HA composite was more than 50%, and the pore distribution was uniform. A majority of pores were perfoliate and crammed with PVA gel. PVA/Laponite-HA layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly film was prepared as a surface layer, in which Laponite acted as a template to improve the dispersion of HA in water. The UHMWPE/HA substrate layer and the porous UHMWPE/HA layer filled with PVA hydrogel were pressed under 180 oC, and then they were combined with the surface layer of LBL film to form a multi-layered composites. The prepared multi-layered composite has a very low friction coefficient (0.017) under a load of 1200 N, which is similar to the friction coefficient of natural articular cartilage.